­ 


Parenting in a Pandemic: Tips to Keep the Calm at Home

View spanish version, share, or print this article.


Fear, uncertainty, and being holed up at home more to slow the spread of COVID-19 can make it tough for families to keep a sense of calm. But it's important to help children feel safe, keep healthy routines, manage their emotions and behavior and build resilience.

Here are some tips from the American Academy (AAP) to help your family get through the stress of the pandemic.

Address childrens fears

Children rely on their parents for safety, both physical and emotional. Reassure your children that you are there for them and that your family will get through this together.

  • Answer questions about the pandemic simply & honestly. Talk with children about any frightening news they hear. It is OK to say people are getting sick, but remind them that following safety steps like hand washing, wearing cloth face coverings, and staying home more will help your family stay healthy.

  • Recognize your childs feelings. Calmly say, for example, I can see that you are upset because you cant have a sleepover with your friends right now. Guiding questions can help older children and teens work through issues. (I know it is disappointing not to be able to do some of the things you did before the pandemic. What are some other ways you can have fun with your friends?)

  • Keep in touch with loved ones. Children may also worry about a grandparent who is living alone or a relative or friend with an increased risk of getting COVID-19. When safe, physically distanced visits arent possible, video chats can help ease their anxiety.

  • Model how to manage feelings. Talk through how you are managing your own feelings. (I am worried about Grandma since I cant go visit her. I will put a reminder on my phone to call her in the morning and the afternoon until it is safe to see her.)

  • Tell your child before you leave the house for work or essential errands. In a calm and reassuring voice, tell them where you are going, how long you will be gone, when you will return, and that you are taking steps to stay safe.

  • Look forward. Tell them that scientists are working hard to figure out how to help people who get sick, how to prevent it, and that things will get better.

  • Offer extra hugs and say I love you more often.

Keep healthy routines

During the pandemic, it is more important than ever to maintain bedtime and other routines. They create a sense of order to the day that offers reassurance in a very uncertain time. All children, including teens, benefit from routines that are predictable yet flexible enough to meet individual needs.

  • Structure the day. With the usual routines thrown off, establish new daily schedules. Break up schoolwork when possible. Older children and teens can help with schedules, but they should follow a general order, such as:

    • wake-up routines, getting dressed, breakfast and some active play in the morning, followed by quiet play and snack to transition into schoolwork.

    • lunch, chores, exercise, some online social time with friends, and then homework in the afternoon.

    • family time & reading before bed.

A word about bedtimes?

Children often have more trouble with bedtime during any stressful period. Try to keep normal nighttime routines such as Book, Brush, Bed for younger children. Put a family picture by their bed for ex??tra love until morning. Bedtimes can shift some for older children and teens, but it is a good idea to keep it in a reasonable range so the sleep-wake cycle isnt thrown off. Too little sleep makes it more challenging to learn and to deal with emotions. Remember to turn off cell phones and other mobile devices an hour before bedtime.?

Use positive discipline

Everyone is more anxious and worried during the pandemic. Younger children may not have the words to describe their feelings. Theyre more likely to act out their stress, anxiety or fear through their behavior (which can, in turn, upset parents, particularly if they are already stressed). Older children and teens may be extra irritable as they miss out on normal events they looked forward to and activities they enjoy with their friends.

Some ways you can help your children manage their emotions and behavior:

  • Redirect bad behavior. Sometimes children misbehave because they are bored or dont know any better. Find something else for them to do.

  • Creative play. Suggest your children draw pictures of ways your family is staying safe. Make a collage and hang it up to remind everyone. Or, build an indoor fort or castle to keep the germs at bay, bringing in favorite stuffed animals or toys.

  • Direct your attention. Attention--to reinforce good behaviors and discourage others--is a powerful tool. Notice good behavior and point it out, praising success and good tries. Explaining clear expectations, particularly with older children, can help with this.

  • Use rewards & privileges to reinforce good behaviors (completing school assignments, chores, getting along with siblings, etc.) that wouldnt normally be given during less stressful times.

  • Know when not to respond. As long as your child isnt doing something dangerous and gets attention for good behavior, ignoring bad behavior can be an effective way of stopping it.

  • Use time-outs. This discipline tool works best by warning children they will get a time-out if they dont stop. Remind them what they did wrong in as few words—and with as little emotionas possible. Then, remove them from the situation for a pre-set length of time (1 minute per year of age is a good guide).

  • Avoid physical punishment. Spanking, hitting, and other forms of physical or corporal punishment risks injury and isnt effective. Physical punishment can increase aggression in children over time, fails to teach them to behave or practice self-control, and can even interfere with normal brain development. Corporal punishment may take away a childs sense of safety and security at home, which are especially needed now.

  • Take care of yourself. Caregivers also should be sure to take care of themselves physically: eat healthy, exercise and get enough sleep. Find ways to decompress and take breaks. If more than one parent is home, take turns watching the children if possible.

  • Take a breath. In addition to reaching out to others for help, the AAP recommends parents feeling overwhelmed or especially stressed try to take just a few seconds to ask themselves:

    • Does the problem represent an immediate danger?

    • How will I feel about this problem tomorrow?

    • Is this situation permanent?

The AAP reminds parents and caregivers never to shake or jerk a child, which could cause permanent injuries and disabilities and even result in death. Tips for calming a fussy baby and advice for caregivers who have reached a breaking point can be found here. If you have a friend, relative, or neighbor with the new baby at home, think of ways you can reach out to provide support during the isolation period.

In many cases, the answers will deflate the panic and the impulse to lash out physically or verbally at children.?

Special time in.

Even with everyone home together 24/7, set aside some special time with each child. You choo?se the time, and let your child choose the activity. Just 10 or 20 minutes of your undivided attention, even if only once every few days, will mean a lot to your child. Keep cell phones off or on silent so you dont get distracted.?

Remember

Reach out to your pediatrician with any concerns you have about your childs behavioral or emotional well-being and managing your familys stress.

Stay informed

Families are encouraged to stay up to date about this situation as we learn more about how to prevent this virus from spreading in homes and in communities.

For more parenting information from the AAP, visit www.HealthyChildren.org.

For the latest developments from the CDC, including travel warnings, new cases, and prevention advice, visit www.cdc.gov.

Any websites, brand names, products, or manufacturers are mentioned for informational and identification purposes only and do not imply an endorsement by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP). The AAP is not responsible for the content of external resources. Information was current at the time of publication. The information contained in this publication should not be used as a substitute for the medical care and advice of your pediatrician. There may be variations in treatment that your pediatrician may recommend based on individual facts and circumstances.

Source: HealthyChildren.org (10/23/20)